tff17_flower_carolina_costa-h_2017 7.5

Tribeca 2017: FLOWER Review

With all-star performances from Zoey Deutch and Joey Morgan and a touching, funny, slightly disturbing (in a good way) script, Flower is one of the best indie comedies I’ve had the pleasure of seeing this year and one that should not be missed.

rupture 2.5

RUPTURE Review

Using played-out torture porn tropes, Steven Shainberg’s sci-fi horror film Rupture feels like a Syfy channel pilot released in the early aughts that never made it to series.

long 9

Tribeca 2017: MR. LONG Review

What makes Mr. Long so endearing is its beautiful simplicity in how it examines humanity and the often-inexplicable connections between us.

i_am_evidence 8

Tribeca 2017: I AM EVIDENCE Review

Succinct and poignant, I Am Evidence is an important telling of a shameful side of our legal system, and one hopes that activists will continue to help make the system itself more accountable.

boy downstairs 6

Tribeca 2017: THE BOY DOWNSTAIRS Review

Sophie Brooks’ script is snappy and fun, injecting a smart indie vibe into what would otherwise be a by-the-numbers rom-com, however with all those trappings present, it’s easy to see where all this is going to go.

Tampopo_still 10

TAMPOPO Criterion Blu-ray Review

Like much of their other offerings, the mere availability of the film - presented with a new 4K digital restoration - could suffice but Criterion goes the extra mile by loading the disc with a multitude of extra features.

3

Tribeca 2017: THE CLAPPER Review

The Clapper is an exercise in patience that rewards viewers with a tacked-on conclusion that does nothing but reinforce the fact that this a film filled with squandered talent and sloppy storytelling.

TFF17_THE_ENDLESS__WILLIAM_TANNER_SAMPSON__1 9

Tribeca 2017: THE ENDLESS Review

The Endless is a masterfully crafted genre hybrid that solidifies Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead as two of the most interesting and uniquely voiced directors working today.

BaD 8

BAD AT DANCING Review

At the center of Joanna Arnow’s short, Bad at Dancing, which she wrote, directed and edited, is an unhealthy relationship between two roommates - Joanna (also Arnow) and Isabel (Eleanore Pienta). Or, it may be completely healthy, who is to judge...besides, perhaps, Isabel’s boyfriend, Matt (Keith Poulson), who is growing increasingly uncomfortable with Joanna’s penchant for inserting herself into his relationship with Isabel, typically when the two of them are trying to have sex. Which appears to be the most opportune time for Joanna to discuss any a number of subject revolving around herself with her best friend; obviously, the opposite is true for Isabel and Matt.

A Morning Light 8.5

A MORNING LIGHT Review

All things familiar, yet all things becoming increasingly sinister, Clark seems to have crafted a sci-fi horror/mystery film with no real, concrete horror elements. Instead, inundating the storyline with plenty of mystery, mystery piled atop mystery. A straightforward narrative film stalked and accosted by the experimental with Clark’s experimental imagery insinuating a cinematic approximation of the metaphysical as flashes of light cycle chaotic, reasoning and context seemingly lost in its rapid shuffle, abstraction deployed as the narrative catalyst.

Going in Style poster 5.5

GOING IN STYLE Review

It’s hard to know what to say about Going in Style because it’s a movie that wishes to bother you as little as possible. Want a couple of mildly wacky heists? Medium-rare banter between three great actors and a fairly committed supporting cast? Obstacles but not too many obstacles? Zach Braff has got your back.

rogue-one--a-star-wars-story-print-blu-ray

ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY Blu-ray Review

The first standalone Star Wars spinoff film, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, has now been released on Blu-ray, and Disney has pulled out all the stops in delivering an exceptional home viewing experience of Gareth Edwards’ harrowing entry in one of the most iconic film franchises ever.

GhostInTheShell 5

GHOST IN THE SHELL Review

Ghost in the Shell is beautiful to look at, its nameless Asian city resembling Blade Runner’s dystopian future Los Angeles complete with even more, and larger, holographic advertisements cutting though the dreary concrete landscape. What’s missing in the milieu are a heart, soul, and brain – even though all of those things are constantly mentioned as integral to the imitative narrative.