tragedy_girls 7

TRAGEDY GIRLS Review

Tragedy Girls digs into the commodification of mass grief and hysteria that marks the town’s usable reactions to the deaths.

Birthing Room 01 - Red Christmas Photo by Douglas Burdorff 5

RED CHRISTMAS Blu-Ray Review

Red Christmas isn’t afraid to raise complex moral questions and doesn’t back down from their stickiness, but ultimately there’s a lack of pushing the debate fully into tastelessness or a profound purgation.

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HAPPY DEATH DAY Review

Largely bloodless, the PG-13 chiller marries its conceit with basic horror conventions delightfully while riding the charisma of its fantastic lead actress through the chaotic time loop.

the-meyerowitz-stories 7

THE MEYEROWITZ STORIES Review

Baumbach’s recent output has all been distinctly happier than his first few films, but the underlying personal crises seem more devastating.

dementia_13 4

DEMENTIA 13 Review

Dementia 13 comes across as rigid and bland in a way that, seemingly in the effort to differ itself from the original, it had to sacrifice any traceable sliver of a personality.

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A WOMAN ON THE TELEPHONE: CAROL Review

Erica Genereux Smith clearly has a thing for telephones. And, office spaces. Or, I should say telephones in office spaces operated by women, to be more specific. It was the focal point of Are You With Me?, her short film from 2016 that landed on my year-end review of shorts last December.

flatliners1 3.5

FLATLINERS Review

If we were to go off of the film's mundane ruminations over the experience of knocking at death's door, the afterlife is an eternal purgatory of being forced to relive the most middling of direct-to-DVD horror films scene by scene.

battle-of-the-sexes 6.5

BATTLE OF THE SEXES Review

Battle of the Sexes plays like its own outline, dutifully moving from scene to scene under the most workmanlike of precisions.

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SOY NERO Review

The first half of Soy Nero is a good movie about a young, undocumented immigrant who navigates a labyrinthine system in a quest to achieve citizenship. The second half is an efficient, bracing war film about a small band of soldiers who are ambushed and have to navigate a desolate, dangerous desert.

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DAVID LYNCH: THE ART LIFE Criterion Blu-ray Review

I love the work of David Lynch, and while I did find this film to be an interesting watch, the Criterion Collection is a project aimed to gather and preserve important pieces of cinema; I just don’t think this release fits within that mold.

Taron crop 5.5

KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE Review

The Golden Circle still has its set pieces and its jaw-dropping moments of high-octane action and choreography, but I was stuck on whether or not we needed this much more of it in the grand scheme of things.

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FRIEND REQUEST Review

Wholly derivative and focusing on tedium rather than authentic scares, or even a point, Friend Request benignly works through the beats of its supernatural social media premise.

Thirst_Street_Poster_Hi-Res_Theatrical_860 6.5

THIRST STREET Review

Grief and loss can push people to extremes, and Nathan Silver’s Thirst Street, co-written with C. Mason Wells, showcases a psychological character study of a flight attendant named Gina (played by Lindsay Burdge) who decides to make a new life for herself in Paris. A one-night stand with bartender Jérôme (Damien Bonnard) precipitates this decision, and her adoration for him leads to some undesirable outcomes.