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Another SYLVIO Review

The warmth and gentleness at the center of Sylvio is swaddled in creativity, layers and layers of inventive, joy-inducing DIY creativity. The film is a testament to the wide-ranging powers of imagination and to see these ideas so lovingly crafted and produced on-screen is an absolute delight. Whatever the reasoning, the sight of Herbert Herpels sinking jumper or planting a tree, with his hands on display like a surgeon awaiting gloves warms my heart. Also, I’m still not sure why an anthropomorphized gorilla displaying genuine kindness and affection through simple hand gestures, muted grunts, and positive posture moved me so, but it did nonetheless.

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STREAMING: Christopher Jason Bell’s left + Q & A

Back towards the end of June, I covered Christopher Jason Bell's left for my For Future Reference feature and, now, I am happy to announce the online premiere of that film right here at Film Pulse. The film is available for free and streaming at the bottom of the page. I also had the chance to conduct an interview with Bell about the making of his film and his thoughts on online self-distribution.

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A WOMAN ON THE TELEPHONE: CAROL Review

Erica Genereux Smith clearly has a thing for telephones. And, office spaces. Or, I should say telephones in office spaces operated by women, to be more specific. It was the focal point of Are You With Me?, her short film from 2016 that landed on my year-end review of shorts last December.

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THIRST STREET Review

Grief and loss can push people to extremes, and Nathan Silver’s Thirst Street, co-written with C. Mason Wells, showcases a psychological character study of a flight attendant named Gina (played by Lindsay Burdge) who decides to make a new life for herself in Paris. A one-night stand with bartender Jérôme (Damien Bonnard) precipitates this decision, and her adoration for him leads to some undesirable outcomes.

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FUGUE Review

Now available to stream via NoBudge.com

In Fugue, the latest feature-length from director Jorge Torres-Torres, we are met with the present existence of a young woman, Claire (Sophie Traub), on a foreign island,

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LEMON Review

Janicza Bravo’s debut feature, Lemon, is a triptych of a mediocre man named Isaac (played by Brett Gelman), a stunted man with a deteriorating set of social skills who currently finds himself in a challenging stretch of his life brought on by his inability to think of anyone but himself.

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Short Film: ADAM AND JOEL

Theodore Collatos’s latest short is one that is positioned as an origin, of sorts, for his upcoming feature-length film, Tormenting the Hen (which I covered here); an influential starting point that informs a certain segment of his feature, specifically, as variations of

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L’IMPORTANT C’EST D’AIMER Review

Another restoration is slated for the screen, this time premiering at Quad Cinema this July 14th, by way of Rialto Pictures, is Andrzej Zulawski’s L’important C’est D’aimer from 1975 in what is being billed as the “U.S. Theatrical Premiere Engagement of the film.” Up until this point in time, the best way in which to view this particular Zulawski would be an imported copy from Mondo Vision paired with an all-region player.

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NYAFF 2017: DAWN OF THE FELINES Review

Maybe it’s nothing more than a nod to Noboru Tanaka’s 1972 film, The Night of the Felines. Perhaps, something was lost in translation or there is a cultural disconnect but as it stands to me now, in the present, Dawn of the Felines contains an absolute dearth of redeeming qualities.